Safety Forum for Gun Incident at Fort Colville

Police-badge-_wcyb.comOn February 7, 2013 two fifth grade students planned to carry out a plot to kill classmates at the Fort Colville Elementary school. Luckily, a fourth grade student saw one of these boys with a knife and reported it to an adult averting the disaster. The school district called the police and the parents of the intended victims, but the rest of the school district remained uninformed for at least 4 more hours.

I found that many parents learned about the incident through the noon report on KCRK-FM 92.1. The school district did send out a recorded message on the school messenger system several hours later.

Why didn’t the school inform every parent immediately? My personal theory is because they wanted to make sure they kept the kids in school until they received a full day’s pay for them before they notified the parents. I believe students needed to be in school until 12:30  for the school to be paid a full day.

Were all the people in charge of making the decision to postpone notifying the parents in agreement? The superintendent, all principals and all school board directors. Any principal has the authority to make the decision on their own.

Did our administrators put their budget before the safety of our children? It’s easier to see the totality of this if we

Kitchenfire_flickr.comput it in more simplistic terms. What if your kitchen had a small fire in it at 8 o’clock in the morning, but the babysitter chose not to tell you until you arrived home in the evening? Even if the disaster was averted, you should have been notified. Am I wrong?

Did the school also make an effort to withhold the details from the public? Most of the relevant information we received was from the media – and much of it was days or weeks later. Would you like to hear from the radio station on your lunch hour that there was an incident at your home hours earlier? And then days later, you find out important details about how it started, again from the media? If the situation is wrong for a babysitter and one child, then it is exponentially wrong for a school district with thousands of children. I believe the school district should have been up front and open with us.

What happened after the incident? They had a “Safety Forum” on February 13, 2013 at the Colville High School Auditorium. This would appear to be open, honest and pro-active in their duties for keeping our children safe, but let’s look at the details to find out. Continue reading

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Safety Forum Photo’s

THIS POST IS INFORMATION PERTAINING TO THE POST TITLED

“SAFETY FORUM FOR GUN INCIDENT AT FORT COLVILLE”

In order for me to give an honest view point of the Safety Forum held February 13, 2013, I need to show you the charts the community created through a brainstorming session. People listed items they thought were important safety items. After a certain amount of time, the brainstorming session closed and every participant was given several dots to use to place their votes. You can see the dots on the charts.

I am including the photo’s and a listing beneath each one because some of them are difficult to read. Each photo is numbered and named with a word or two from the top of the chart to help with discussion specifics. I have listed the votes for each item on the left and I have numbered each item so that it can also be recognized in a discussion. In some cases I have included two photo’s to help you see the text on the charts.

1 Communication

1 Communication

0      1.1       Communication – website – more info

0      1.2       Reality from kidding “I’ll kill him”

1      1.3       Government agencies already being paid doing security

0      1.4     Law enforcement familiar with all schools floor plans in stevens county

4      1.5     Why were specific kids targeted?

1      1.6     Fort Colville – No open house, no come see the school meet the teachers – no security to enter even the incident

2      1.7     All teachers on same level of communication to students across the district in each school.

1      1.8       Mental/social health concerns Continue reading